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Arthritic KneeNormal KneeKnee Anatomy

As the largest joint in your body, the knee provides stability and mobility. It is composed of the lower end of the thighbone (femur), the shin bone (tibia), and the knee cap (patella). These three bones connect at the articular cartilage, a smooth substance, that cushions the bones and enables them to move easily. The rest of the knee is covered by a thin, smooth tissue liner that releases a special fluid to lubricate the knee. When all these components work together, friction is eliminated and patients can move easily.

Arthritis

The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis, which develops after years of continuous motion and pressure on your joints. Typically, patients will experience intense pain and decreased range of motion, resulting from the cartilage becoming inflamed. When non-surgical treatments no longer work, it may be time to consider joint replacement surgery.

In the illustration to the right, the left knee shows arthritis and the right knee shows one without arthritis.

 

 

Minimally Invasive Knee Replacement

In a partial knee replacement, the surgeon only replaces the damaged parts of the joint.
During the procedure, the surgeon will make a small incision and gently put in place supporting structures in order to gain access to the damaged area. The arthritic portions are removed and then replaced with implants specific to a patient’s anatomy.
Ideal candidates have arthritis confined to a single portion of their knee and are not morbidly obese. Patients typically experience reduced blood loss, lower rates of complications, and return to normal activities one to two months post surgery.

 

Knee Replacement

knee

In a knee replacement, an incision is made down the center of the knee, and the diseased bone and cartilage components are removed and replaced with metal and plastic implants. The implant components act like natural cartilage, allowing the bones to smoothly function.

The illustration to the right shows an incision is made down the center of the knee, and the diseased bone and cartilage components are removed and replaced with metal and plastic implants.

Every surgery is different, but a typical surgery can last between one to two hours and an additional two hours can be added depending on the amount of time spent before surgery and in the recovery room. Most patients will return home three to five days following surgery.

 

Learn more about this procedure by reading this brochure or watching the animation below.